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WWI Memorial

Just outside of Crawford Lecture Hall in the Bellas/Dixon Math and Science Center, visitors will find Berkshire's memorial to students who served during The Great War: 1914-1918. The names of the students are carved into an archway that once stood as the opening to the Head of School's office in Memorial Hall, and was preserved during the building's demolition.

At the top of the archway are the names of five Berkshire students who lost their lives while in service to the country. Their lives are remembered, in part, due to the work of students in Mr. Nielsen and Mr. Gappa's Modern World History classes whose research will remain as a permanent record for the Berkshire community for years to come.

A special thank you to Sue Delmolino-Ives and Jodi Rathbun in Berkshire's Development Office, and to Judy Donald, archivist at Choate Rosemary Hall, for their help with the research.

Henry Sidney Ehret Jr.

Henry Sidney Ehret Jr. was born in Philadelphia, PA in 1896. Before coming to Berkshire School, Henry, also known as Harry, attended St. Paul’s School (Concord, NH) from 1910-1913. Ehret went on to attend Berkshire from 1913-1916 and graduated as a member of the class of 1916. At Berkshire, Ehret was involved in a number of extracurricular activities. He played football, hockey, and baseball, and during his senior year he served as the captain of the hockey team as a left winger. He is described in The Dome as being, “a fast and untiring skater.” Ehret was also a member of the Dance Committee from 1915 to 1916, an associate editor of the 1916 yearbook, and he participated in Berkshire’s theatrical production of Stop Thief! in 1916.

Ehret went on to attend Princeton University and enlisted at the federal military training camp in Elizabeth Park, NJ. He served as a Lieutenant during the war and spent time in France as a Naval and Marine Corps Aviator. Following his service overseas, Ehret was stationed in Miami, FL as a flight instructor at the Marine Flying Field. He was seriously injured in car accident in Miami and died on December 31, 1918 as a result of his injuries.

Ehret’s classmates at Princeton established The Henry Sidney Ehret Jr. War Memorial Scholarship in his honor, He is buried in the Ehret Masoleum in West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, PA.

Henry Sidney Ehret Jr.

 

Edward Hooper Gardiner

Edward Hooper Gardiner was born on May 14, 1896 in Boston, MA. Gardiner attended Berkshire School from 1911-1915. While at Berkshire, Gardiner (nicknamed "Ted") played football and baseball and was a member of the Rifle Club. He graduated from Berkshire as a four year senior in 1915.

Gardiner went on to enroll at Harvard University but left school to enroll in reserve officer training in Plattsburg, NY in 1916. He was commissioned as an officer in 1917 and was sent overseas to be stationed with the 50th Aero Squadron, Air Service, American Expeditionary Force, near Pont-à-Mousson, France. Second Lieutenant Edward Hooper Gardiner was killed in action on September 12, 1918 while flying a reconnaissance mission near Thimonville, Lorraine during the Saint-Mihiel Offensive.

 

Edward Watson Hatch

Edward Watson Hatch was born on August 31, 1899 in Hartford, CT. Hatch attended Berkshire before transferring to Choate in 1914. Hatch demonstrated an interest in military maneuvers while at Choate and in December of 1917 enlisted in the U.S. Army. He was assigned to Headquarters Co. 58th Pioneer Infantry as a private and was sent for training to Camp Wadsworth in Spartanburg, SC.

In April 1918, Hatch was promoted to sergeant in the infantry. He later contracted influenza, which developed into pneumonia. He died of illness on Thanksgiving morning, November 28, 1918, at the age of 19. He is buried at Cedar Hill Cemetery in Hartford, CT.

Edward Watson Hatch

 

Joseph Mallalieu King

Joseph Mallalieu King was born on October 24, 1898 in Lincoln, NE. King entered Berkshire as a member of the Class of 1919, but only attended for his sophomore year. King left the United States in the spring of 1918 with the intention of joining the French Flying Corps. He ended up, however, serving as an ambulance driver with the Red Cross on the Italian Front.

King was killed by an Austrian shell, which exploded near the Red Cross volunteer headquarters in Bassano, Italy. According to The Story of the American Red Cross in Italy, “He faced death with a smile, as a brave man should, and passed away peacefully six hours after he had been wounded.”

King’s body was transported back to the United States and he is buried with his parents in Lincoln, NE.

Joseph Mallalieu King

 

Edward McClure Peters Jr. 

Edward McClure Peters Jr. was born on December 25, 1892 in Jersey City, NJ. Peters grew up in Brooklyn, NY and came to Berkshire in 1907. He would graduate as a member Berkshire’s Class of 1912. While at Berkshire, Peters was part of the Dramatic Association, the Rifle Club, a member of the Decoration Committee, editor-in-chief of The Dome, and associate editor of the yearbook. He was also a member of football, baseball, and track teams. There remains a cross-country trophy named in his honor. 

After graduating from Berkshire, Peters attended Harvard University where he was a member of the cross-country and track teams. He graduated from Harvard in 1916 and the following fall enlisted in the Army. Peters was sent to France in the summer of 1917 and was eventually promoted to First Lieutenant in the 16th U.S. Infantry.  He commanded the 2nd Company’s Machine Gun Battalion in the 1st Brigade of the American Expeditionary Force. Peters was killed in action at Seicheprey in the Lorraine Region of France on March 11, 1918. He is buried at the Saint-Mihiel American Cemetery and Memorial in Lorraine, France.

Edward McClure Peters Jr.