Advanced Math/Science Research Update

by Dr. April Burch, Director of the AMSR program

January 15, 2013

Since our last update, Berkshire School hosted student researchers from Belmont Hill, and all-boys prep school outside of Boston, for a 1-day mini-symposium on Student Biomedical Research. The goal was to foster collaboration, communication and community outreach with our students.  AMSR students Liza Bernstein '13, Sissi Wang '13, Lars Robinson '13, Elsie Guevara '13, Ernest Yue '13, and Nate MacKenzie '14, gave short talks about their work in the new Bellas/Dixon Math and Science lecture hall. The talks were followed up by break-out sessions where Belmont Hill students described their research projects and students discussed commonalities between the projects and future goals.

The second semester of AMSR started with some terrific news. The AMSR program was awarded a grant from The Chinchester Dupont Foundation for the purchase of an EVOS fluorescence microscope.  This piece of equipment will expand the types of experiments and analyses that can be done by AMSR students this and future years.  The microscope should arrive shortly, and Dr. Burch has invited everyone to stop in for a look next time they are on campus. 

One new, exciting project that is underway in the winter season of AMSR in the afternoons is being spearheaded by Elif Kesaf '14.  Elif is from Turkey and seeks to identify novel viruses of non-pathogenic strains of Legionella bacterium from travertines in Pamukkale. In collaboration with Dr. Sunny Shin at the Perlman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, she will be working to isolate viruses of this bacterium with the hope of identifying new agents to combat Legionnaires' disease caused by a pathogenic form of Legionella.

Look for more news from Dr. Burch in the next issue!

Odyssey Night
Posted 05/14/2012 09:22AM

Odyssey Night

Classical Epic Meets Contemporary Treatment

Odyssey Night resumed its storied place among the ranks of form-related performances, this time with a 21st-century twist.

The students in all five English III sections, under the direction of their wily instructors (Mr. McKeegan and Dr. Kohlhepp), worked together to dramatize selected scenes from Homer's epic. The focus of the night was Books 9-12, in which Odysseus and his men nibble on lotus leaves, escape from the cyclops, dally with Circe, descend into the House of Death, and navigate the treacherous waters between Scylla and Charybdis. The major departure from past incarnations of the event was that these Odysseian voyagers submitted their scene in the form of a short film, having shot footage all over campus the previous week.

Click here to view the videos.

Each scholar appeared in her respective scene and contributed to the overall execution of her class's film, charged with one of four tasks:  scriptwriting, costumes and props, videography and editing.  According to the members of Dr. Kohlhepp's D period class, who tacked on some cast interviews as a "bonus feature," this year's Odyssey Night project provided a fresh way for them to tackle Homer's epic.  "This was really different," observed Logan Bell. "The assignment got us to think about literature in a whole new light."

The event set sail with Kohlhepp's H period Advanced section, who brought us Book 9, set on the fearsome island of the cyclops, played by Austin Hovey and friends.  Strong costuming and props, along with a well-designed script, distinguished this group's effort and garnered them the Third Formers' vote for "Best Film."  Book 10 featured Kohlhepp's F period section, who used a variety of campus locations and climatological conditions -- Greek epic in the snow! -- to portray Odysseus' windblown travails and escape from Circe, played with pluck by Reilly Kennedy.  (A special thanks goes to Professor Anselmi, who cleared out boxes in Senior House, which was magically transformed into Circe's palace.) 

"The return of Odyssey Night represents an important step forward, rather than backward, for Berkshire English, since as the students themselves implied, making a film adaptation gives new vigor to this ancient but still vital text," said Evan Clary, English Department Chair.

Berkshire School

245 North Undermountain Road
 |  Sheffield, MA 01257
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